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I conceived of the ‘embassies of thought’ for the 20th Biennale as temporary settings without borders, representing transient homes for constellations of thought. The themes allocated to each of these ‘embassies’ were inspired by the individual histories of each venue, while the ‘in-between spaces’ speak to one of the key ideas in this Biennale; exploring the distinction between virtual and physical worlds. I’m very pleased audiences embraced the idea of the embassies and explored the ‘in-between spaces’. It was a tremendous pleasure to work with so many outstanding artists and to show so many new and specially realised works.
— Stephanie Rosenthal,
Artistic Director
20th Biennale of Sydney
Lee Bul
Cockatoo Island
Xu Zhen
(Produced by MadeIn Company)
Cockatoo Island
Justene Williams with Sydney Chamber Opera
Cockatoo Island
Messages of
Support
Rupert Myer AO
Chair, Australia Council for the Arts

The 20th Biennale of Sydney: The future is already here – it's just not evenly distributed exhibited works from 83 artists, attracting more than 640,000 visitors to numerous locations enticingly defined as ‘embassies of thought’. Artistic Director Stephanie Rosenthal presented an innovative Biennale that sought to explore the ephemeral and static nature of the visual arts.

As a key international contemporary visual arts event, the Biennale provides a vital platform for supporting Australia’s artists through commissioning of ambitious new works and collaborations with artists from across the globe.

As the Australian Government's arts funding and advisory body, the Australia Council for the Arts is delighted to support the Biennale and its important legacy of over 40 years of ensuring more Australians have access to, and engage with the arts.

I would like to congratulate the Biennale of Sydney’s commitment to celebrating the role of the arts in daily life, and for supporting artists to make great art. The transformative power of artistic expression enriches our lives and makes an important contribution to our society.

The Hon Troy Grant MP
Minister for the Arts

New South Wales is proud to host the Biennale of Sydney — one of the leading art events in the Asia-Pacific region.

The success of the 20th Biennale of Sydney: The future is already here — it’s just not evenly distributed confirms the Biennale as one of the most celebrated, respected and well established contemporary art exhibitions in the world.

The NSW Government is committed to ensuring that this state remains the creative capital of Australia, and our continuing support of the Biennale provides opportunities for artists and audiences to engage with world-class ideas, images, objects and experiences.

Every staging of the Biennale provides a highly visible platform to showcase the strength and diversity of Australian artists, while also positioning them alongside their international peers. The exhibition encourages the exchange of ideas that progress artists’ careers and development and grows and maintains Sydney’s reputation as a global city.

I commend all 83 participating artists and the many presenting venues — including the Art Gallery of NSW, the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Carriageworks and Artspace — for the stimulating, insightful and beautiful works. Congratulations also to Artistic Director Stephanie Rosenthal, Chief Executive Ben Strout and the hardworking Biennale team for delivering yet another successful exhibition.

Clover Moore
Lord Mayor of Sydney

I congratulate the organisers and participants of the 20th Biennale of Sydney: The future is already here – it’s just not evenly distributed.

The Biennale has become a key event on Sydney’s cultural calendar. I was delighted to see the use of multiple venues throughout our wonderful city, where visitors could experience the many contemporary art works and explore the interaction between the virtual and physical worlds.

This exploration of the spaces where cultures and ways of thinking intertwine were a welcome addition to this year’s event and allowed for works that provoke thought and step beyond the traditional spaces for artistic expression, including significant contributions from Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists.

The City of Sydney recognises the important role of art and creativity in nurturing a sustainable and culturally vibrant city, and is a proud sponsor of the Biennale of Sydney. With the provision of over $1.6 million for the 21st Biennale of Sydney, the City’s support includes a mix of annual funding, value in-kind and the commissioning of a legacy artwork.

This year’s commission, 'Here, an Echo' (2016), by Agatha Gothe-Snape, is a series of large-scale texts chosen from the various performances conducted during this year’s Biennale. We are delighted the artwork will become a permanent fixture of Sydney’s public art collection.

I commend Artistic Director, Dr Stephanie Rosenthal and all the artists whose works featured at this year’s event, for their contribution to Sydney’s art scene. It gives me great pleasure to see our cultural life continue to thrive with events like the Biennale of Sydney.

Kerr Neilson
Neilson Foundation – Principal Patron

The Neilson Foundation is delighted to be the principal private financial patron of the Biennale of Sydney.

The pleasure comes from the broad exposure the Biennale gives to Sydneysiders and visitors to delight in contemporary art. Attendees are able to come together to revel in a creative experience that is distinct from their daily routines. It invites the opportunity to engage with the imagination of the artists and to create their own imaginings in the company of friends or family.

The combination of indoor and outdoor displays across a range of settings allow all to experience Sydney's natural beauty and economic vibrancy.

In a world that is increasingly threatened by insularity, paradoxically aided by mobile devices, the Biennale of Sydney allows us to gain a broader and clearer perspective from local and global artistic talent.

Message from
the Chairman
Kate Mills

Our 20th edition, under the artistic direction of Stephanie Rosenthal, engaged hundreds of thousands of local, interstate and international visitors. It is my honour on behalf of all at the Biennale of Sydney to thank first Stephanie for her vision, commitment and creative stewardship. I am delighted to share this report of some of the achievements of the 2016 exhibition, which was so well received by audiences.

I also gratefully acknowledge the generous support of our major government partners – city, state and federal – along with private philanthropic supporters and individuals, international funding agencies and corporate partners who enable the Biennale exhibition to be presented free to all. The Biennale is also indebted to its Exhibition Partners: the Art Gallery of New South Wales, the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Carriageworks, Artspace and the Sydney Harbour Federation Trust (Cockatoo Island), who not only provide expertise and support but also play a central role in welcoming our many thousands of visitors and making the Biennale such a success.

I especially thank our Principal Patron, the Neilson Foundation – its generous support in 2016 has given the Biennale certainty to deliver yet another exceptional exhibition.

I also wish to make special mention of our Board and the great team of staff and volunteers without whom it would not have been possible to stage the 20th edition. The Biennale of Sydney is indebted to their knowledge, skill, commitment and indefatigable efforts in championing the exhibition.

Above all, I wish to express our deep gratitude to the participating artists for creating the world that we inhabited for the duration of this exhibition and for the lasting impressions they gifted to us.

Message from
the CEO
Ben Strout

With the close of our exhibition in early June 2016, the Biennale of Sydney has successfully produced 20 ground-breaking international editions over the course of a remarkable 43-year history. We continue as one of the longest running contemporary art biennials in the world, respected as an active force in the development and public appreciation of contemporary art in Australia since 1973.

In every edition we strive to realise the artistic vision of an internationally renowned curator, presenting the best contemporary art of our times.

For 2016, Artistic Director Stephanie Rosenthal created one of our most diverse programs ever, premiering artworks at 17 different locations across Sydney, from the galleries of our long-established major museum and gallery partners, to the heritage listed Cockatoo Island, two sections of the Royal Botanic Gardens, the unique sandstone architecture of Mortuary Station, multiple local street corners and a 168-year old cemetery in the Inner West. We presented over 200 artworks created by 83 artists from 35 countries and recorded our second largest ever total visitation at just over 643,000.

We are extremely proud of our 20th edition, and are pleased that so many Sydney residents and visitors – from across the state, the nation and the globe – came to enjoy it.

Hundreds of people are involved in the creation and installation of each Biennale exhibition. In particular, I sing the praises of the talented and dedicated Biennale team. In turn, we could not have achieved this year’s success without the support of our funders, donors, volunteers and corporate partners. We are extremely grateful for their commitment and enthusiasm.

We are all delighted to be able to share a selection of Biennale highlights with you, as detailed in the following pages.

Perhaps, the ‘walk away’ from this exhibition is our own capacity for transformation and re-emergence in this artistic and social climate. So often curators fail to leave enough space for that in their exhibitions, especially within the biennale vernacular, and Rosenthal has delivered an exhibition that has a more empathetic approach.
Gina Fairley
Artshub.com, 16 March 2016
Around the
World

Artists

Int. Visitors

Nat. Visitors

Web Visitors

Artist Countries of Origin

Australia:
14

Austria:
1

Brazil:
1

Canada:
1

China:
1

Columbia:
5

Denmark:
1

England:
5

France:
5

Germany:
1

India:
2

Indonesia:
1

Ireland:
1

Israel:
1

Japan:
4

Malaysia:
1

New Zealand:
2

Nigeria:
1

Norway:
1

Philippines:
1

Singapore:
3

South Korea:
2

Spain:
1

Sweden:
1

Switzerland:
1

Taiwan:
6

Thailand:
2

The Netherlands:
3

Turkey:
2

Ukraine:
1

USA:
10

Zimbabwe:
1

International Visitor Origin

UK
18%

USA
18%

NZ
12%

China
7%

Germany
4%

Singapore
4%

Japan
3%

Canada
3%

France
3%

South Korea
3%

Spain
2%

Italy
2%

Ireland
2%

Malaysia
2%

Philippines
2%

Other
14%

National Visitor Origin

Sydney
62%

Interstate
13%

Other NSW
8%

Website Visitor Origin

Australia
84.05%

United States
3.76%

United Kingdom
1.49%

New Zealand
1.34%

Japan
0.80%

Germany
0.79%

France
0.59%

South Korea
0.44%

Italy
0.43%

Canada
0.36%

Singapore
0.36%

Spain
0.32%

India
0.31%

Taiwan
0.31%

Russia
0.29%

Netherlands
0.26%

Hong Kong
0.26%

Brazil
0.22%

Ukraine
0.19%

Mexico
0.18%

Turkey
0.17%

China
0.16%

Belgium
0.16%

Colombia
0.16%

Israel
0.16%

Rosenthal’s 20th Biennale of Sydney is certainly a vast tableau, a snapshot of the state of the planet and the contemporary human condition. You need to see a lot of it to appreciate how well the multiple threads condense into a deep coherence. See too little and you may be disappointed. Overall, its chief concern is the collective vision and our role in directing humanity’s collective future. In many respects, the art could be said to defer to the urgency of the biennale’s many conversations. Several of its most important events take place in the closing four weeks. It is as if, after having given you time to absorb the breadth of its scope, you are invited back to reflect on what you have seen.
Anne Finegan
Artlink, April 2016
Agatha Gothe-Snape
Cockatoo Island
Emma McNally
Cockatoo Island
Korakrit Arunanondchai
Cockatoo Island
Chiharu Shiota
Cockatoo Island
Exhibition
Report
Curated by Stephanie Rosenthal, the 20th Biennale of Sydney, held from 18 March until 5 June 2016, featured more than 200 artworks by 83 artists and included 70% new commissions.

The future is already here — it’s just not evenly distributed, the title of the 20th Biennale of Sydney exhibition, was inspired by a comment by leading science-fiction author William Gibson. It suggests that technology has already surpassed our idea of what the future could look like.

The first part of the title speaks to the fact that the 20th exhibition was about the now; but more than that, it suggested that perhaps we have already surpassed our own ideas about the future. Each era posits a different view of reality, and the 20th Biennale of Sydney asked: what is ours?

The second part of the title reminds us that access to information, the internet and other more basic resources is by no means universal; many people are denied the opportunity to benefit from (or participate in) these new spaces where information can be exchanged. These conditions of uneven distribution are not inevitable, however; they are largely the result of historical and current geopolitics and economic power structures. As we have seen with the influx of political refugees not just into Australia, but internationally, one consequence of this uneven distribution is social upheaval on a scale unprecedented in recent world history.

Rosenthal conceived of the ‘embassies of thought’ for the 20th Biennale as temporary settings without borders, representing transient homes for constellations of thought. The themes allocated to each of these ‘embassies’ were inspired by the individual histories of each venue, while the 'in-between spaces' speak to one of the key ideas in this Biennale; exploring the distinction between virtual and physical worlds.

Former convict settlement and shipyard Cockatoo Island hosted the Embassy of the Real, where artists explored how we perceive reality in our increasingly digitised era, and the spaces between the virtual and physical.

The Museum of Contemporary Art Australia hosted the Embassy of Translation, bringing together a selection of works that contextualised historical positions, concepts and artefacts, alongside contemporary concerns and working methods.

The Embassy of Spirits at the Art Gallery of New South Wales saw artists consider the intersection between the spiritual and the philosophical.

The Embassy of Non-Participation was located at Artspace in Woolloomooloo, a former artists’ squat now renowned as a site for experimentation. For the 20th Biennale, artist duo Karen Mirza and Brad Butler took over Artspace, considering how the act of ‘non-participation’ may also be an active and critical position.

A first time venue for the Biennale of Sydney, Mortuary Station in Chippendale was reimagined as the Embassy of Transition. Works by two artists, Marco Chiandetti and Charwei Tsai, were presented; in different ways they each engaged with cycles of life and death, as well as rites of passage. Additionally, Oscar Murillo presented a project at the venue which was included during the course of the exhibition.

The Embassy of Stanislaw Lem, conceived by Heman Chong, took the form of a roving book-stall which appeared at various locations throughout the exhibition.

At Carriageworks, the Embassy of Disappearance brought together works by artists exploring themes of absence and memory, including disappearing languages, histories, currencies and landscapes.

Performance

Performance featured strongly in the Biennale of Sydney in 2016, enlivening the exhibition across the three-month period, with highlights including the Australian premiere of manger (2014) by Boris Charmatz following his keynote address at Carriageworks on 19 March 2016. Justene Williams collaborated with Sydney Chamber Opera to stage ‘Victory Over the Sun’ (2016), a sell-out three-night performance on Cockatoo Island during opening week, representing a radical revisioning of the legendary Futurist (anti-)opera first performed in St Petersburg, Russia, in 1913.

During the opening days, Mette Edvardsen’s ‘Time has fallen asleep in the afternoon sunshine’ gathered a collection of living books at Newtown Library. 20th Biennale Attaché Adrian Heathfield curated a special project titled ‘ghost telephone’ for the Art Gallery of New South Wales, a month-long serial improvisation of interlinked works from Hahn Rowe, Chrysa Parkinson, Philipp Gehmacher and Benoît Lachambre.

Other highlights included performances and activated projects by Neha Choksi ‘In Memory of the Last Sunset’ (2016), in collaboration with Alice Cummins; Mella Jaarsma’s ‘Dogwalk’ (2015-16); Adam Linder’s ‘Some Proximity’ (2014); and Germaine Kruip’s ‘A Square, Spoken’ (2015/16) which took place daily. The midway point of the 20th Biennale was marked at Carriageworks with a simultaneous act of obliteration and transformation, as Lee Mingwei altered his monumental work ‘Guernica in Sand’ (2006/16) in a one-off performance on 23 April.

For this edition of the Biennale, Agatha Gothe-Snape presented a series of performances with dancer and choreographer Brooke Stamp, taking place along a pathway extending from Speakers’ Corner in the Domain to Wemyss Lane, Surry Hills. Called ‘Here, an Echo’ (2016), the artist has described the work as a “choreography for the city” – a score, performance and document – and these experiences have informed the development of a number of short phrases, which will be installed as large-scale texts in Wemyss Lane as a permanent part of the City of Sydney’s Public Art Collection.

The 20th Biennale of Sydney featured significant contributions from Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists including Nyapanyapa Yunupingu at the Art Gallery of NSW and Daniel Boyd, whose work, ‘What Remains’ (2016), a large-scale installation featuring thousands of mirrored disks arranged on a building in Redfern, remains in situ for the time being. Richard Bell’s latest iteration of ‘Embassy’ (2013-ongoing), an ‘in-between’ project located on the MCA Australia forecourt was a restaging and homage to the original Aboriginal Tent Embassy first assembled by activists on the lawn of Parliament House, Canberra, in 1972.

In addition to artworks presented across the seven embassies, the 20th Biennale commissioned twelve site-specific ‘in-between’ projects that took place at locations throughout inner Sydney, including a new work ‘Fade Away, Fade Away, Fade Away’ (2016) by Swedish artist Bo Christian Larsson that unfolded over the course of the exhibition at Camperdown Cemetery. In a former gallery space in Redfern, artist collective Barbara Cleveland (Frances Barrett, Kate Blackmore, Kelly Doley and Diana Smith), formerly known as Brown Council, created an evolving archive of performance art told from a multiplicity of perspectives. Through participatory performance, re-enactment and lectures that took place most Saturdays, ‘Making History’ (2016) examined how feminist methodologies and alternative historiographical approaches can be used to reimagine past acts and events in the here-and-now.

Within the makeshift architecture of her work ‘We Built this City’ (2016) at Vine Street in Redfern, Keg de Souza established the Redfern School of Displacement, serving as a platform for discussions with special invited guests designed to cultivate local knowledge about globally relevant issues and promote learning as a tool to combat forces of dispossession.

As part of The Future of Disappearance, a project curated by André Lepecki for the 20th Biennale, Brazilian artist Ricardo Basbaum created ‘diagram (the future of disappearance)’ (2016), a large-scale billboard at 95 Commonwealth Street, Surry Hills.

Evan Roth presented ‘Internet Landscapes: Sydney’ (2016), a web-based project that offered simultaneous experiences of the internet’s physical, digital and cultural landscape. Roth’s blending of the physical and virtual was in line with the 20th Biennale’s interest in new ways of folding the world ‘into’ the self, but also alluded to the slowly eroding optimistic and egalitarian values that characterised earlier incarnations of the internet.

Alongside works in the Biennale that dealt explicitly with the second part of the exhibition title, “it’s just not evenly distributed”, a dedicated blog and public program series accompanied the exhibition. Through talks, commissioned writing and video statements, a range of contributors examined conditions of uneven distribution. Among others, contributors to the blog included Cécile B. Evans, Zaina Erhaim, Ole Häntzschel, Adam Kleinman, Robert Maharajh, Map Kibera, Oscar Murillo, Saskia Sassen, Keg de Souza and Kentaro Toyama.

“We don’t need to be from the same language, the same nation, or the same culture, but we still might come together to discuss the same subject matter,” said Rosenthal, and amid the strong showing of Singaporeans and Colombians and Berliners, she has plenty of evidence.
Sherman Sam
Artforum, May 2016
The
Artists
Embassy of the Real
Cockatoo Island
Korakrit Arunanondchai
(Thailand/USA)


Samuel Beckett
(Ireland/France)


boychild
(USA/Hong Kong)


Joyce Campbell
(New Zealand)


Cevdet Erek
(Turkey)


Cécile B. Evans
(USA/Germany/England)


William Forsythe
(United States/Germany)


Agatha Gothe-Snape
(Australia)


Nilbar Güreş
(Turkey/Austria)


Camille Henrot
(France/USA)


Bharti Kher
(England/India)


Germaine Kruip
(The Netherlands)


Lee Bul
(South Korea)


Emma McNally
(England)


Miguel Ángel Rojas
(Colombia)


Maaike Schoorel
(The Netherlands)


Chiharu Shiota
(Japan/Germany)


Alexis Teplin
(USA/England)


Justene Williams
(Australia)


Ming Wong
(Singapore/Germany)


Xu Zhen
(Produced by Madeln Company) (China)


Embassy of Translation
Museum of Contemporary Art Australia
Nina Beier
(Denmark/Germany)


Daniel Boyd
(Australia)


Céline Condorelli
(France/England)


Noa Eshkol
(Israel)


Germaine Kruip
(The Netherlands)


Adam Linder
(Australia/Germany/USA)


Helen Marten
(England)


Kazimir Malevich
(Ukraine/Russia)


Shahryar Nashat
(Switzerland/ Germany/USA)


Dayanita Singh
(India)


Embassy of Spirits
Art Gallery of New South Wales
Johanna Calle
(Colombia)


Joyce Campbell with Richard Niania
(New Zealand)


Yin-Ju Chen
(Taiwan)


Erub Arts
(Australia)


Sheila Hicks
(USA/France)


Mella Jaarsma
(The Netherlands/Indonesia)


Jumana Manna
(USA/Germany)


Dane Mitchell
(New Zealand)


Christoph Schlingensief
(Germany)


Sudarshan Shetty
(India)


Taro Shinoda
(Japan)


Rodel Tapaya
(Philippines)


Ken Thaiday Snr with Jason Christopher
(Australia)


Nyapanyapa Yunupingu
(Australia)


ghost telephone
(curated by Adrian Heathfield), with:
Philipp Gehmacher (Austria),
Benoît Lachambre (Canada),
Chrysa Parkinson (USA/Belgium),
Hahn Rowe (USA)


Kazimir Malevich (reference material 'Victory Over The Sun')
Museum of Contemporary Art Australia
Adam Linder
Museum of Contemporary Art Australia
Embassy of Non-Participation
Artspace
Karen Mirza and Brad Butler
(England/Turkey)


Embassy of Transition
Mortuary Station
Marco Chiandetti
(England)


Charwei Tsai
(Taiwan/Vietnam)


Oscar Murillo
(Colombia/England)


Embassy of Disappearance
Carriageworks
Lauren Brincat
(Australia)


Boris Charmatz
(France)


Chen Chieh-jen
(Taiwan)


Don’t Follow the Wind
(Japan/various locations)


Neha Choksi
(USA/India)


Yannick Dauby and Wan Shuen Tsai
(France/Taiwan) & (Taiwan)


William Forsythe
(United States/Germany)


FX Harsono
(Indonesia)


Charles Lim
(Singapore)


Minouk Lim
(South Korea)


Gerald Machona
(Zimbabwe/South Africa)


Lee Mingwei
(Taiwan/USA)


Yuta Nakamura
(Japan)


Otobong Nkanga
(Nigeria/Belgium)


Jamie North
(Australia)


Melik Ohanian
(France/USA)


Bernardo Ortiz
(Colombia/Brazil)


Mike Parr
(Australia)


Robert Zhao Renhui
(Singapore)


María Isabel Rueda
(Colombia)


Aura Satz
(Spain/England)


Apichatpong Weerasethakul
(Thailand)


Yao Jui-chung + Lost Society Document
(Taiwan)


Embassy of Stanislaw Lem
Mobile Book Stall
Heman Chong
(Malaysia/Singapore)
In-Between Spaces
Cemetery, Newtown

Bo Christian Larsson

(Sweden/Germany)


Royal Botanic Garden, Sydney

Archie Moore
(Australia)

Dane Mitchell
(New Zealand)


130 Abercrombie Street, Chippendale (incomplete project)

Oscar Murillo
(Colombia/England)


Redfern Wall (Corner Vine and Eveleigh Streets, Redfern)

Daniel Boyd
(Australia)


16 Vine Street, Redfern

Keg de Souza
(Australia)


86 George Street, Redfern

Barbara Cleveland (Kate Blackmore, Kelly Doley, Francis Barrett, Diana Smith)
(Australia)


The Future of Disappearance

95 Commonwealth Street, Surry Hills,

Newtown Library and Carriageworks

Ricardo Basbaum
(Brazil)

Mette Edvardsen
(Norway/Belgium)


The Domain and other locations

Agatha Gothe-Snape
(Australia)


Museum of Contemporary Art Australia Forecourt, Circular Quay West

Richard Bell
(Australia)


20th Biennale of Sydney Catalogue Intervention

Falke Pisano
(The Netherlands/Germany)


Online Project: 20bos.com

Evan Roth
(USA/France)


These days, anyone wanting to play with the future had best be very careful if they want to avoid being effortlessly wrong-footed. That awareness seems to be the spirit in which Stephanie Rosenthal, artistic director of the 2016 Sydney Biennale, has recycled William Gibson’s quote about the future already being here, just not very evenly distributed.
Mel Rumble
Sydney’s Biennale:  All futures lead to now   New Scientist, May 2016
Céline Condorelli
Museum of Contemporary Art Australia
Noa Eshkol
Museum of Contemporary Art Australia
Audience
and Visitation

Attracting 643,437 visits, the 20th Biennale of Sydney: The future is already here – it’s just not evenly distributed was the second highest visitation on record. Attendances were buoyed by interstate, international and local visitors flocking to explore seven ‘embassies of thought’ and 12 ‘in-between spaces’ around Sydney’s inner west and CBD.

17
from overseas
(est.as 79,141 unique visitors)
62
from metropolitan Sydney
(est.as 237,984 unique visitors)
13
from interstate
(est.as 48,751 unique visitors)
8
from other NSW
(est.as 32,685 unique visitors)
A sci-fi-inflected enquiry into the twenty-first-century conception of reality.
Adeline Chia
Art Review, Summer 2016
Visitor Feedback
and Research

Independent audience research on the 20th Biennale of Sydney was conducted by StollzNow Research. More than 1,300 surveys were administered at major exhibition venues during the 12-week exhibition period.

AUDIENCE
39
of our audience
is under 35yrs
AUDIENCE
17
of our audience
comes from overseas
VISITORS
81
of visitors rate their satisfaction of
the Biennale as Excellent/Good
VISITORS
High education: more than
3/4 of our audience have
an undergraduate or post
graduate degree and above
average household income
VISITORS
50
were first-time visitors, suggesting we are
engaging new audiences as well as retaining
previous visitors
 
2/3 of our audience
is female
 
12
of these visitors came specifically to
Sydney to visit the Biennale
VISITORS
61
of visitors came from across the Sydney
metropolitan area without any single region or
regions dominating
VISITORS
More than
75
were highly motivated by the
love of art
VISITORS
The Biennale's audience is culturally
diverse with
40
of our audience identifying
as multicultural
Mella Jaarsma
Art Gallery of NSW
Taro Shinoda
Art Gallery of NSW
Nyapanyapa Yunupingu
Art Gallery of NSW
Programs &
Education
REPORT

In the lead up to and during the exhibition period more than 580 separate public and education programs were held in Sydney, across Australia and in the region.


Combined with visits from primary, secondary and tertiary education and community groups, these initiatives reached more than 34,000 people.

Programming this year was defined by a wish for the 20th Biennale to function as a kind of public research project – one that gained momentum and grew into itself over time. Meetings, performance lectures and choreographed walks, talks, conversations, guided tours, workshops and reading groups offered many and different ways of exploring the sets of ideas represented in the Biennale’s ‘embassies of thought’, realised together with artists and invited guests.

In Sydney
Public program and education activities took place across the city, some of which were realised together with local institutions and initiatives, including Critical Path, Frontyard, 107 Projects, Alaska Projects, the Redfern Community Centre and the Italian Cultural Institute (Sydney), in response to the exhibition’s desire to activate local neighbourhoods and the city’s ‘in-between’ spaces.

During the opening week, Boris Charmatz asked, ‘Is the public space the right architecture for a Musée de la danse?’ in an inspiring keynote address at Carriageworks, preceding the Australian premiere of his work 'manger' (2014); Adrian Heathfield examined some ‘Spirited Affinities’ for the Nick Waterlow OAM Memorial Lecture at the Art Gallery of New South Wales; André Lepecki discussed the chronopolitics of disappearance in relation to some works presented at the Biennale, as part of his project ‘The Future of Disappearance’; artists, attachés and guests Nina Beier, Shahryar Nashat, Céline Condorelli, Anna Gritz, Mami Kataoka, Joyce Campbell, Mella Jaarsma, Dane Mitchell, Richard Niania, Taro Shinoda and Suhanya Raffel came together for in-conversation events exploring the individual embassies; and 19 other participating artists contributed to a series of individual or conversation-format talks illuminating their projects and interests.

Punctuating a week brimming with performances and discursive events facilitated by artists as their contributions to the Biennale, the array of events built a lively atmosphere of exchange that continued through the exhibition.

Over three months, events took place daily; from lectures to performances, futuring workshops, reading groups and weekly walking tours. Several themed series were launched as platforms exploring Biennale themes: the Not Evenly Distributed series focused on issues of access in terms of technology, resources, citizenship and political rights; Transition Talks, in which guest speakers discussed life, death, crossing boundaries, spirituality and mythology at Mortuary Station; Performance Talks, in association with the School of the Arts & Media, UNSW Arts & Social Sciences, brought together performance theorists, curators and makers together for lectures, masterclasses, a mini-symposium and a ‘Choreography and the Gallery’ salon; and Arts Futuring Workshops were four nights of futuring culminating in an exhibition facilitated by local initiative Frontyard. Among the many contributions that made these series possible, we thank especially UNSW Art & Design and the University of Sydney.

Preceding and spanning the exhibition period, The Bureau of Writing was a special project presented in association with Artspace, which ran from September 2015 to June 2016. Both a collaborative writing program for artists and a platform for events, The Bureau unfolded over nine months of workshops, seminars, talks and readings. Mentored by artists, curators and writers Adrian Heathfield, Constant Dullaart, Gerry Bibby, Heman Chong, Anna Gibbs and Eileen Myles, participating Australian artists Andrew Brooks, Beth Caird, Kelly Fliedner, Benjamin Forster, Astrid Lorange, Aodhan Madden and Sarah Rodigari came together to consider how writing might constitute performance, how meaning is produced through language and how our understanding of text been changed through

experimental, performative, feminist, queer and ficto-critical writing practices. New work resulting from the program included an audio essay, audio installation, website intervention, lecture and a collaboratively authored publication: ‘with a body always but but still drying’.

With Critical Path, the Biennale co-presented a three-day live work by London-based artist Nicola Conibere (‘Assembly’), a performance piece by Israel-based choreographer and performance artist Lilach Livne (‘TRANSCENDING, for Peace’), a series of chain conversations with Biennale participants André Lepecki, Nicola Conibere, Agatha Gothe-Snape, Brooke Stamp and Lilach Livne, and a presentation of Benoît Lachambre’s work-in-progress, ‘LIFEGUARD’.

Over three separate Sundays, Festival Days, supported by Hyundai on Cockatoo Island offered activities for all: art-making stations inspired by Biennale artworks and participatory workshops on costume-making, movement, photography and illustration. Installations created by secondary students in response to the 20th Biennale were on display in the Public Program and Education hub: the result of a hands-on program presented in partnership with I-Manifest together with mentors from art, design and creative industries. The final Festival Day hosted Sydney’s first Internet Yami-Ichi, a real life market place of internet-ish things.

School Holiday Workshops on Cockatoo Island were an opportunity for children to engage creatively with the art and ideas around them, taking place in the 20th Biennale’s dedicated space for programs and workshops on Cockatoo Island. The hub featured modular, custom-designed furniture by Melbourne-based design studio Superscale (winners of the Open Agenda design competition that the Biennale ran in partnership with UTS Architecture).

Throughout the exhibition, over 4,600 visitors to Cockatoo Island and Carriageworks enjoyed free daily tours delivered by undergraduate and postgraduate students from UNSW Art & Design, and Biennale staff presented popular Saturday morning walking tours to the exhibition’s ‘in-between spaces’. Access programs were delivered at three Biennale venues, with tailored tours (such as audio described, Auslan interpreted and ‘plain English’ tours) offered regularly and on demand for visitors to Cockatoo Island and Carriageworks.

The Biennale welcomed over 18,900 education visitors to the exhibition, and supported the attendance of schools, tertiary institutions and community groups to Cockatoo Island with a free education ferry service operating on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Over 3,600 students travelled on the Biennale’s education ferry over the course of the exhibition.

Highlights from the education program include a masterclass series for secondary school students presented by the Biennale with the Art Gallery of New South Wales, in which staff from both institutions answered students’ questions about ‘How to Work in the Arts without Being an Artist’. The Biennale’s Student Newspaper was reimagined for our 20th edition to give secondary school students a platform for their creativity and opinions, and Primary and Secondary Education Kits supported teachers with information and activities before, during and after a visit to the Biennale.

Across Australia
Thanks to assistance from The Russell Mills Foundation, Regional & Public Galleries NSW and Museums & Galleries of NSW, the Public Program and Education team visited 12 regional and greater Sydney venues between November 2015 to February 2016, delivering talks and presentations at Bathurst Regional Gallery, Blue Mountains Cultural Centre, Broken Hill Regional Art Gallery, Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre, Dubbo Western Plains Cultural Centre,

Hazelhurst Regional Art Gallery, Lismore Regional Gallery, Maitland Regional Art Gallery, MAMA Albury, Penrith Regional Gallery and the Lewers Bequest, Wagga Wagga Art Gallery and Wollongong Art Gallery. Talks, seminars and workshops were held with 10 secondary schools in these locations.

Participating artists and Attachés gave talks and workshops at local universities (Sydney College of the Arts, National Art School, UNSW Art & Design, Paddington and UNSW, Kensington) and in several interstate locations: through February and March 2016, the Biennale facilitated the involvement of visiting international artists in public talks, masterclasses and conversations, in partnership with Australian Centre for Contemporary Art (ACCA), Melbourne; Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI), Melbourne; CACSA, Adelaide; Institute of Modern Art (IMA), Brisbane; Monash University Museum of Art (MUMA) in association with Sharing Space; Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA), Brisbane; and Success, Freemantle. These artist engagements were made possible with generous assistance from the Nelson Meers Foundation.

Agatha Gothe-Snape with Brooke Stamp Documentation of Outsiding, 2015, a scored walk from Dr Chau Chak Wing Building to Hollywood Hotel, 6 November 2015. Photograph: Zan Wimberley
Creative movement workshop led by Serena Chalker, award-winning independent artist and co-director of Anything Is Valid Dance Theatre. Festival Day, 1 May 2016, Cockatoo Island. Photograph: Leanna Maione
Artist Neha Choksi in conversation with Attaché Geraldine Barlow during the opening weekend of the 20th Biennale at Carriageworks, 19 March 2016. Photograph: Julia Bavyka
A Saturday morning walking tour through the 20th Biennale's in-between spaces visits Barbara Cleveland's (formerly Brown Council's) Making History, 2016 at 86 George Street, Redfern. Photograph: Julia Bavyka
Artistic Director Stephanie Rosenthal in conversation with dancer and choreographer Boris Charmatz after his Keynote Address, ‘Is the public space the right architecture for a Musée de la danse?’, 19 March 2016, Carriageworks. Photograph: Zan Wimberley
Reading by legendary poet, novelist, performer and art journalist Eileen Myles, 25 May 2016, Artspace, for The Bureau of Writing. Photograph: Jessica Maurer
London-based artist Emma McNally speaks about her meticulously drafted, intuitive drawings exhibited at the Embassy of the Real (Cockatoo Island), 18 March 2016. Photograph: Document Photography
Launch of The Bureau of Writing, 12 September 2015, Artspace. Pictured (L-R): Benjamin Forster, Astrid Lorange, Andrew Brooks. Photograph: Gunther Hang
Opening of Flexing muscle by Gerry Bibby and The Bureau of Writing, 18 February 2016, Artspace, for The Bureau of Writing. Photograph: Rafaela Pandolfini
Roslyn Helper's Chat Club (Episode 21), a live performance that brought the artist’s secret Facebook group to life for the Internet Yami-Ichi, Festival Day, 29 May 2016, Cockatoo Island. Photograph: Leanna Maione
The Internet Yami-Ichi on the third Festival Day at Cockatoo Island, 29 May 2016. A real-life marketplace for ‘internet-ish’ stuff. Photograph: Leanna Maione
Assembly for Alternative Futures, May 2016, Artspace, as part of the 20th Biennale of Sydney public program. Photograph: Kelly Doley
Our team ready for School Holiday Workshops at the Public Program and Education Hub on Cockatoo Island, 19-23 April 2016. Photograph: Anton Rehrl
School Holiday Workshops at the Public Program and Education Hub on Cockatoo Island, 19-23 April 2016. Photograph: Anton Rehrl
Rosamund Bartlett tells the story Malevich and the Black Square, 100 years on at MCA Australia, 23 March 2016. Photograph: Julia Bavyka
Shelley Lasica, Deanne Butterworth and Jo Lloyd, How How Choreography Works for 2016. Choreography and the Gallery, a one-day salon at the Art Gallery of NSW presented in partnership with the School of the Arts & Media, UNSW Arts & Social Sciences for the 20th Biennale. Photograph: Document Photography
Members of the Karrabing Film Collective on stage for a Q&A with Tanith Glynn-Maloney after the premiere of Wutharr, Saltwater Dreams (2016) at the Art Gallery of NSW, 4 June 2016. Part of the Not Evenly Distributed series for the 20th Biennale of Sydney, made possible with assistance from the University of Sydney. Photograph: Julia Bavyka
Rosamund Bartlett tells the story Malevich and theBlack Square, 100 years on at MCA Australia, 23 March 2016. Photograph: Julia Bavyka
One of many free daily tours on Cockatoo Island, delivered by undergraduate and postgraduate students from UNSW Art & Design. Photograph: Leanna Maione
Artists Céline Condorelli, Nina Beier and Shahryar Nashat discussing different approaches to ‘translation’ in the context of their work at the Embassy of Translation (MCA Australia), moderated by Attaché Anna Gritz, 17 March 2016. Photograph: Document Photography (In background: Noa Eshkol’s wall carpets)
Arts Futuring Workshops, held at Frontyard, Marrickville during the Biennale. Image courtesy Frontyard Projects.
Arriving at Cockatoo Island. Photograph: Leanna Maione
Visitors in Korakrit Arunanondchai’s installation Painting with history in a room filled with people with funny names 3, 2015–16, Cockatoo Island. This version created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney and made possible with assistance from Dr Clinton Ng. Courtesy the artist; C L E A R I N G, New York and Brussels; and Carlos/Ishikawa, London. Photograph: Leanna Maione
Festival Day on Cockatoo Island, 29 May 2016. Photograph: Leanna Maione
Biennale Info Hub on Cockatoo Island. Photograph: Leanna Maione
Media and
Reach
DIGITAL

The 20th Biennale website (20bos.com) attracted 380,000 sessions, with 246,051 unique visitors, from 186 different countries. Over this period (28 October 2015 – 5 June 2016), more than 1.2 million page views were generated. The website featured content on the exhibition including venue and visitor information; artist information and images; videos; searchable and tagged content; a calendar of programs and events, with a planner functionality; and integrated social media channels.

A social media aggregator tool was implemented and featured user-generated content on the homepage, venue pages and behind-the-scenes page. Overall, the site provided various opportunities for audiences to interact with the Biennale, before, during and after their visit.

The Biennale continues to manage active social media channels on Facebook (+54,000 fans), Twitter (+22,500 followers), Instagram (+17,500 followers) and YouTube (more than 10,000 channel views in the period October 2015 – June 2016). Activity and engagement on these channels grew steadily in the lead-up and remained strong throughout the exhibition period.

FACEBOOK
54,000
32%
Followers 2016 (up from 41,000 in 2014)
TWITTER
22,600
56%
Followers 2016 (up from 14,500 in 2014)
INSTAGRAM
22,500
462%
Followers 2016 (up from 4,000 in 2014)
MEDIA COVERAGE

The publicity campaign focused on preview, review and editorial coverage of the 20th Biennale, in both local and international markets. Close to 200 stories aimed at national audience were published throughout the campaign, including interviews with the Artistic Director as well as an overview of highlight works in the Biennale.

Another highlight was the widespread, positive broadcast television coverage about the 20th Biennale of Sydney with major feature stories appearing on ABC Lateline, ABC 730 Report, Channel 9 News, Network Ten News, Channel Seven News, Channel Seven Sydney Weekender, Channel Seven Sunrise breakfast (six weather crosses) and ABC TV The Mix.

Approximately 115 articles aimed at international audiences were placed with publications reaching the Asia Pacific, the Americas, the Middle East and Europe, both as overall Biennale features and focusing on individual artists from those regions. While 175 stories aimed at domestic audience were placed with leading Sydney metropolitan media outlets including the Sydney Morning Herald, Daily Telegraph, TimeOut Sydney, Central Sydney, ABC Radio 702 Sydney, Broadsheet Sydney, Two Thousand and Concrete Playground.

The Media Preview (15 March 2016) was attended by more than 150 guests, including local, national and international press. Commencing with an official function at Cockatoo Island, the all-day guided preview provided members of the press with full access to Biennale venues, artworks and artists, facilitating sought-after interview and photographic opportunities.

To July 2016, almost 500 articles and stories have appeared in an array of media including:

  • BBC News
  • Art Monthly UK
  • The Guardian AU
  • ABC 702
  • ABC TV Lateline
  • The Conversation AU
  • Channels 7, 9 , 10, SBS News
  • Blouin ArtInfo
  • ABC TV News Breakfast
  • Vogue Australia
  • Sydney Morning Herald
  • Mashable
  • ArtAsiaPacific
  • Artshub
  • Australian Financial Review
  • Wallpaper magazine
  • Daily Telegraph
  • Frieze magazine
  • Financial Times (UK)
  • Artforum
  • NY Arts Magazine
  • The Art Newspaper
At the 20th Biennale of Sydney, guest artistic director Stephanie Rosenthal – chief curator at London’s Hayward Gallery – addresses the urgency for reaction to and reflection upon our current place in time. She has assembled 83 international artists from 35 countries to exhibit, perform and spark debate across seven venues, or 'Embassies of Thought', including major cultural institutions plus a constellation of ‘in-between spaces’ spread across the city over three months.
Dimity Noble
Wallpaper* March, 2016
Charwei Tsai
Mortuary Station
Marco Chiandetti
Mortuary Station
Development

The Biennale of Sydney is made possible through the consistent and invaluable network of supporters, including government, corporate and cultural funding partners, as well as private foundations and patrons.

The advocacy and commitment of these supporters enables the Biennale to deliver an ambitious exhibition and programs, and importantly, present the work of contemporary artists from around the world on Australian shores.

All three tiers of Australian Government support the Biennale, through the City of Sydney, Arts NSW, Australia Council for the Arts and the Visual Arts and Crafts Strategy (VACS). Representing approximately 34 percent of the Biennale’s total income toward the 20th Biennale of Sydney, this core funding assists the Biennale in making a significant contribution to art and culture, nationally and internationally.

Corporate and Exhibition Partners provided vital financial and in-kind contributions to the 20th edition with invaluable professional support and expertise, allowing Biennale programs, projects and the exhibition to expand beyond what could otherwise have been realised.

27 Cultural Funding Agencies from 18 countries supported artist projects, providing essential funding toward the creation of many artists’ works in areas such as travel and accommodation, production, presentation costs and freight.

Private giving contributed 26 percent of the Biennale’s total income for the 20th Biennale of Sydney, an increase of nearly 40 percent on revenue received through philanthropy toward the 19th Biennale of Sydney (2014). Foundations and private patrons continue to be a key element of making the Biennale of Sydney possible, with the organisation continuing to welcome Benefactors, Foundations, Donors and Friends to get involved with our exhibitions and programs.

We gratefully acknowledge the generous support of all our partners and supporters.

Revenue
and Expenditure
TOTAL REVENUE
1.Aus Government34%
2.Corporate Partners & Venues29%
3.International & Australian Cultural Funding Agencies8%
4.Benefactors, Patrons & Friends26%
5.Other Revenue3%
PRIVATE REVENUE GROWTH 13th TO 20th
REVENUE GROWTH 13th TO 20th EXHIBITION
TOTAL EXPENDITURE
1.Exhibition, Events & Programs50%
2.Marketing14%
3.Development7%
4.Staff Costs25%
5.Administration5%
Note: all figures are based on cash and in-kind results for each 2 year exhibition cycle (forecast Sept 2016). Calculations are modeled on categories and principles established in previous cycles. ‘Private’ includes: Benefaction, Foundations, Project Patrons and Friends
Heman Chong
Mobile Book Stall
Partners
Benefactors
Founding Governor
Franco Belgiorno-Nettis AC CBE

Founding Patrons
The Belgiorno-Nettis Family
Transfield Holdings

Principal Patrons 20th Biennale of Sydney
The Neilson Foundation

Governors
Anonymous
International Production Fund 2016:
Outset England, Outset Israel, white rainbow
Julian Knights AO and Lizanne Knights
Kate Mills and Sally Breen
Penelope Seidler AM

Ambassadors
Susan Acret and James Roth
Andrew Cameron AM and Cathy Cameron
Julia Champtaloup and Andrew Rothery
Johanna Featherstone and Geoff Ainsworth AM
Lisa Goldberg and Danny Goldberg OAM
The Hansen Family
Phillip Keir and Sarah Benjamin
Vicki Olsson
Roslyn and Tony Oxley
Lorraine Tarabay and Nick Langley
Georgie and Alastair Taylor
Michael Whitworth and Dr Candice Bruce

Associates
Ginny and Leslie Green
Julian and Stephanie Grose
Amanda Harkness and Karen Barrett
Elizabeth Laverty
Nelson Meers Foundation
Janie Michell
Gene Sherman AM and Brian Sherman AM
Vanessa Tay
Apichatpong Weerasethakul
Carriageworks
Gerald Machona
Carriageworks
Boris Charmatz
Carriageworks
Jamie North
Carriageworks

Benefactors
Claire Armstrong and John Sharpe
Richard Banks and Chrissie Jeffery
Tor and Tony Bannon
Candy Bennett and Edwina Lehmann
Blain|Southern
Peter Braithwaite
Marah Braye
Martin Browne and Ahmed Begdouri
Chartwell Trust
Susan Cocks and Dr Ben Robinson
Sarah Cottier and Ashley Barber
James Darling AM and Lesley Forwood
DETACHED, Hobart
Paul and Saadia Durham
Richard and Harriett England
Barbara Flynn
Rick and Jan Frolich
Ross and Jinnie Gavin
Dame Jenny Gibbs
GrantPirrie Private
Stephanie and Ian Hardy
Susan Hilliard
Sam and Margo Hill-Smith
Neil Hobbs and Karina Harris
Mark Hughes
Walter and Elizabeth Lewin
Amanda and Andrew Love
Lowenden Foundation
Benjamin Mangold
The Russell Mills Foundation
Nanda Hobbs Contemporary
Galerie neugerriemschneider
Dr Clinton Ng
Lisa and Egil Paulsen
John Phillips
Dr Dick Quan
Elizabeth Ramsden
SCAF Patrons’ Circle
John Schaeffer AO and Bettina Dalton
Gosia Schild
Anna and Morry Schwartz
Vivienne Sharpe
Lawrence Smith and Anthea Williamson
Jennifer Stafford and Jon Nicholson
Ursula Sullivan and Joanna Strumpf
TKG+
Lucy Turnbull
Women’s Art Group (WAG)
Dr Terry Wu and Dr Melinda Tee
Di Yeldham
Mercedes Zobel

Companions
Clitheroe Foundation
Annette Larkin
Dominik Mersch
Ezekiel Solomon AM
STATION, Melbourne
Anna Waldmann
Cultural Funding
Lee Mingwei
Carriageworks
Neha Choksi
Carriageworks
Minouk Lim
Carriageworks
Mike Parr
Carriageworks
Board, Staff
& Thanks
Artists in the 20th Biennale of Sydney wish to thank the
following organisations and individuals who have
supported their projects:

Adam Mickiewicz Institute
Ammodo
Anastasia Murney
ARNDT Art Agency, Singapore and Berlin
Arts NSW
Australia Council for the Arts
Australian Steel Mill Services (ASMS)
Chi-Wen Gallery
ELAM School of Fine Arts, University of Auckland
Espace Louis Vuitton Munchen
Event Engineering
Greg Potter
Henis Family
Higashiyama Artists Placement Service (HAPS)
Japanese Government Overseas
Study Program for Artists
Kevin O’Brien Architects
Kyoto Prefectural Library
Maspro Denkoh Corporation
Miwaki Tezuka
Philipp Otto Runge Stiftung
Redfern Community Centre remove
Sadie Coles HQ, London
Sunbrella
Thierry Porte


The Biennale is grateful to the
following lenders:

Art Gallery of New South Wales
Australian Museum
Cairns Regional Gallery
John Chia and Cheryl Loh
Richard and Harriett England
Lisa and Danny Goldberg
Iziko South African National Gallery
JUT Museum Pre-opening office
K11 Art Foundation
Kyoto Prefectural Library
Maclean Collection
The Noa Eshkol Foundation for Movement Notation
The New Church Museum
Anthony Scott
Eleonora and Michael Triguboff
White Rabbit Collection, Sydney
and other private collectors who wish to remain anonymous


Founding Patrons

The Biennale of Sydney applauds 40 years of patronage by
Transfield Holdings and the Belgiorno-Nettis Family.

Biennale of Sydney Archive

The Biennale Archive includes physical records from the first nineteen editions of the Biennale of Sydney, forming the most comprehensive archive of national and international contemporary art activity in Australia. Since the first edition in 1973, the Biennale has featured over 1700 artists from more than 100 countries and has grown to become one of Australia's great cultural events. In 2015, the Biennale of Sydney has been supported by Transfield Holdings specifically to enable the documentation of the Biennale Archive and its gifting to the Art Gallery of New South Wales as part of the Gallery's new National Art Archive initiative.

Karen Mirza and Brad Butler
Artspace


Biennale Board and Staff

Kate Mills, Chairman
Julian Knights AO, Deputy Chairman
James Roth
Michael Whitworth
Paris Neilson
Penelope Seidler AM
Tea Uglow
Phillip Keir (former Chair)
Finance Audit and Compliance Committee

Michael Whitworth, Convenor
Julian Knights AO
James Roth
Benefaction and Events Committee

Paris Neilson, Convenor
Sarah Benjamin
Cathy Cameron
Stephanie Grose
Lorraine Tarabay
Georgie Taylor

Artistic Direction

Stephanie Rosenthal
Artistic Director

Attachés

Sam Bardaouil and Till Fellrath
Geraldine Kirrihi Barlow
Jessica Cerasi
Stephen Gilchrist
Anna Gritz
Adrian Heathfield
Mami Kataoka
Hicham Khalidi
Pablo Léon de la Barra
André Lepecki
Markus Miessen
Aveek Sen
Artistic Director's London Office

Jessica Cerasi
Assistant Curator

Mara-Johanna Koelmel
Curatorial Research Assistant

Yoshika Yajima
Curatorial Research Assistant

Andreas Lechthaler
Exhibition Designer



Biennale Staff

Ben Strout
Chief Executive Officer


Exhibition and Curatorial

Gina Hall
Head of Exhibition

Alex Pedley
Curatorial Research Assistant

Andy Lysle
Installation Coordinator

Bree Richards
Nick Waterlow OAM Curatorial Fellow

Caroline Geraghty
Registrar

Charlotte Hickson
Exhibition Administrator

Gotaro Uematsu
AV Coordinator

Kartini Ludwig
Exhibition & Project Coordinator
Kate Davis
Artist Liaison

Mike Smith
Exhibition Manager

Nyssa Miller
Cockatoo Island Administrator

Tai Spruyt
Curatorial Research Manager

Tim Barker
Technical Production Manager

Tony Mighell
Project Manager
(Carriageworks)

Vanessa Fraser
Curatorial Research Assistant
Public Programs & Education

Melissa Ratliff
Curator and Manager of PPE

Alana Ambados
PPE Coordinator

Lauren Giusti
PPE Assistant

Sponsorship

Lisa Panarello
Sponsorship Manager

Rohan Morris
Sponsorship Assistant
Benefaction

Barbara Moore
Head of Benefaction

Sarah Hetherington
Benefaction Manager

Anna Meyerowitz
Guest Relations Assistant

Sandra Di Palma
Events Assistant


Marketing and Communications

Terry Harding
Head of Marketing

Claude Moelan
Digital Media Producer

Lauren Barber
Communications Designer

Liz Malcolm
Publications Coordinator

Perrine Huber
Marketing Coordinator

Robyn Grant
Signage Coordinator

Design Agency
For The People

PR Consultants
Kym Elphinstone articulate
Rhiannon Pickles PR (Europe)

Administration and Planning

Summar Hipworth
Head of Administration & Planning

Ashley Collis
Administration Coordinator

Haitian Liu
Accountant
Ilse Moreno
Volunteer Coordinator

Event Teamwork
Jana Wunderlich
Jessica Collins

Former Staff

We gratefully acknowledge former staff who have contributed to the realisation of the 20th Biennale of Sydney. Amelia Ramsden (Grants and Applications Manager), Ashley de Silva (Head of Marketing and Sponsorship), Ciara Derkenne (Curatorial Assistant), Danielle Earp (Deputy Head of Exhibition and Acting Chief Executive Officer), Lauren Parker (Registrar), Nisa Mackie ( Public Program and Education Manager), Travis Rice (Exhibition and Venue Manager), William Cottam (Chief Financial Officer).


Installation Team

Mark Bailey, Michael Bennett, Simone Tops, Aaron Anderson, Fraser Anderson, Tim Andrew, Julia Bavyka, Sierra Bell, Sarah Betts, Celia Bradshaw, Luke Brennan, Dorian Cameron-Marlow, Vanessa Cassey, Martin Claydon, Patrick Conwell, Mary-Anne Cornford, Tim Curnick, Nikolaus Dolman, Thomas Dudley, Nicholas Durney, Emma Finneran, Jessica Fitzpatrick, Juan Gerardo Flores Lara, Isaac Gallagher, Sara Givins, Megan Hanson, Emma Louise Hayman, Reuben Holt, Craig Hull, Addie Hutchinson, Ester Karuso-Thurn, Richard Kean, Alex Kiers, Amy Kirkwood, Dominic Kirkwood, Sophie Kitson, Matthew Kruzmetra, Rachael Lafferty, Tim Lathouris, Symon Lawrence, Céline Le Boulleur de Courlon, Daniel Luscombe, Andrew Lysle, Brian Martinez, Eamonn McLoughlin, Nyssa Miller, George-Alex Nagle, Danae Natsis, William Newell, Jessica Pickford, Willa Pratt, Dylan Prins, Luke Purse, Terra Tanja Reeck, Adriano Rosselli, Maia Sinclair-Ferguson, Cara Stewart, Simone Tops, Alda Truong, Jennifer Vella, Aden Wessels, Simon Wilson, Matt Woodham, India Zegan.


We gratefully acknowledge our volunteers and their team leaders who so generously provided their time, energy and enthusiasm to realise the 20th Biennale of Sydney.

Volunteer team leaders: Alexander Abood, Glenda Booth, Seda Cokcetin, Jennie Cooper, Paul Cooper, Louisa Cunningham, Justine Daverio, Juan Gerardo Flores Lara, Julianne Hayes, Lynette Hearne, Sakineh Floura Khosh kish, Alison Leeson, Paula Llull, Kasane Low, Fabio Marques, Saskia Meagher, Davina Norman, Upasana Papadopoulos, Ana Pineda-Vila, Raka Sarkhel, Soo-Min Shim, Daniela Thomas.


Volunteers: Jaime Abondano, Rafah Abuzenada, Lynette Ackerman, Eliza Ackland, Portnoy Alex, Andrea Alford, Lisa Alim, Safia Amadou, Mark Amin, Sherie Anderson, Emma Anstee, Maria Sabina Antigua, Pham April, Midian Aquino, Shallal Bader, Catherine Baradi, Tim Barbarino, Jose Arthur Barbosa Mileo, Jane Barnes, David Barraclough, Ashleigh Basa, Stine Baska, Jamie Bastoli, Marita Batna, Rebekah Beja, Jacqualin Bell, Lara Bendeich, Titia Benders, Max Beniac, Thandi Bethune, Sally Bevan, Renata Bieske, Jeffrey Blewett, Karina Bodnaruk, Mia Boe, Michael Bogle, Sviatoslava Bondarenko, Gina Bonnici, Chris Bonnily, Natalie Borghi, Rosalie Brooker, Madison Brown, Sasha Brown, Mandy Burgess, Kate Burton, Ksenia Buryakova, Binxu Cai, Caprice Cai, Yaqing Cai, Mariah Calman, Zhuojun Cao, Marianne Cara, Suzie Carruthers, Amanda Carson, Marianne Carter, Felix Cehak, Simran Chadha, Stephanie Chambers, Suzu Chan, Samantha Chebatte, Meliana Chen, Jacinta Chesworth, Eugene Cheung, Kara Cheung, Huang Chi, Joanne Chiang, Belinda Chiu, Claudia Chiu, Pellicer Chloe, Hyun Jee Cho, Antoinette Chow, Alvin Claasz, Alastair Clark, Hunter Clarke, Jaimie Clement, Melody Collard, Caitlyn Coman-Sargent, Virginia Constable, Ro Cook, William Corner, Rose Cox, Ron Crause, Lily Cullen Ehrlich, Laura jane Czaikowski, Angela D'Agostino, Evonna Dai, Gabrielle Dandashli, Linh Dao, Wendy Dao, Alexandra D'Astolfo, Karl Dato-on, Frank Davies, Abdulkadir Demir, Ricardo Diaz Peris, Amelia Grace Dibbs, Alice Dingle, Annette Dixon, Sandra Dodds, Chantelle Dollimore, Fiona Donovan, Wendy Dorph, Kenny Douglas, Georgia Dower, Jenny Du, Mark Dubner, Margaux Ducerisier, Emerald Dunn Frost, Samantha Eaton, Hayley Edmonds, Alexandra Edsor, Krishnamurthy Ekambaram, Beverley Emmett, Dominique Erichsen, Maria Arnie Fabillar, Annette Falahey, Jane Fan, Judy Fan, Madeline Feist, Michael Felczynski, Wendy Feltus, Marta Ferracin, Bernadette Fingleton, Adi Firth, Courtney Fleming, Sharon Grace Flynn, Colette Fontaine, Robin Freedman, Iris Fung, Valerie Gaidarly, Emily Galicek, Diane Gallery, Mengqi Gan, Ruhong Gao, Florence Gengoul, Ema George, Kim Geun Mo, Daniele Gianotti, Chloe Gibbs, Saskia Gilmour, Rocio Goncalves Borrega, Rochelle Gould, Sarah Graham, Alessandra Grasso, Joanna Griffiths, Onur Guden, Patricia Guinto, Patty Guo, Emelie Gustavsson, Annette Hagerman, Capucine Hague, Lorrie Hammerton, Jasmine Hanlon, Claire Hanna, Lisa Hannan, Ashleigh Hannes, Huicong Hao, Rachel Harkin, Emma Harlock, Cassie Harris, Janeen Harris, Jens Hasselmeier, Wenhui He, Mala Henderson, Natalie Hilgertova, April Hill, Madeleine Hill, Lucas Ho, Nicholas Ho, Nicola Hodren, Marie Hoffelinck, Taleh Holland, Georgina Holt, Daniella Hormoz, Cynthia Howard, Yujia Hu, Xitong Huang, Zhi-Qing Huang, Caitlin Hughes, Scarlett Huxley, Nancy Incoll, Mary Ann Irvin, Alanna Irwin, Chris Isgro, Tom Issacs, Lilia Jackson, Ankur Jain, Alicja Janicka, Romana Jendruch, Xi Jiang, Angell Jin, Kat Johnson, Mo Johnson, Alexandra Jonscher, Angelina Joseph, Josephina Josephina, Cindy Jow, Ella Judd, Amy Kahn, April Kang, Anzu Kawano, Christine Kazub, Deirdre Keenaghan, Fiona Khor, Sasha Killalea, Daniel Kim, Kevin Minjun Kim, Minji Kim, Rachel King, Anne Kirkby, Fiamma Kitching, Jarek Knoppek, Honglim Koit, Toshiya Komatsu, Mathilde Kraft, Nicole Krivohlavy, Stella Ktenas, Jasmine Kwan, Julius Labay, Rita Lami, James Lan, Fernanda Landi, Erin Landy, Dominic Lea, Gabrielle Leafe, Isabelle Legg, Adelaide Lehmann, Paola Lema, Doris Leung, Wilson Leung, Rachel Levine, Rose Levy, Liana Lewis, Cheng Li, Helen Li, Lana Li, Lena Li, Patrick Lim, Wan Yin Lim, Alison Lin, Macy Lin, Emma Little, Shiwei Liu, Zijing Liu, David Lobb, Nicholas Loder, Josefa Carolina Lopez Ulloa, Karen Lowe, Joyce Lu, Honor Luckhurst, Louise Luo, Tina Luo, Ying Leila Luo-Clausius, Quyen Ly, Brett Lyon, Hengqin Ma, Philip Ma, Wendy Ma, Leigh MacRitchie, Micah Maglaya, Alexandra Malcolm, Ornella Belen Mardones, Sean Maroney, Arielle Marshall, Zoe May, Graham Mc Corkell, Christine McCormack, Chloe McDonald, Isobel McDonald, Robert McDonald, Erin Mcfadyen, Lynette Mcloughlin, Angela Meil, Nico Mele, Shermyn Melendez, Annabel Melhuish, Johnny Meng, Daniil Metelkin, John Middleton, Angela Miletto, June Miskell, Tom Mitchell, Mika Mitsui, Marta Mochi, Katerina Molina, Shubnum Morabi, Geoffrey Moss, Arthur Murgatroyd, Eloise Myatt, William NA, Diane Naggar, Ei Nanaumi, Russell Narvaez, Caroline Nass, Roqkel Nazar, Chelsea Nelson, Jess Nesbitt, Emily Ngo, Anna Nguyen, Carolyn Nguyen, Linda Nguyen, Nina Nguyen, Rosie Niven, Reto Oechslin, David Ojerholm, Tom O'Keeffe, Brendan O'Keeffe, Milly Olrog, Montana O'Neill, Mary Osborn, Kylie Pan, Anne-Laure Paquot, Anastasia Parmson, Esme Parr, Cynthia Parra Gonzalez, Andrew Parrott, Jessica Parr-Whalley, Marisa Pasicznik Ross, Tara Pearson, Amanda Peng, Sophia Peng, Moises Peralta, Priscilla Perrin, Laura Perritt, Chung Pey-Harn, Khanh Ngan Pham, Katy Phillips, Jasmine Phung, Elle Picton, Cornelis Pieterse, Karlene Pircher, Maude Plante, Elena Platonova, Oksana Ponomarenko, Nerissa Puth, Qing Qiu, Janice Quach, Emmy Ramos, Sarah Raslan, Sabina Ratnapala, Louise Reily, Sarah Remfrey, Yolanda Reyes, Margo Reynolds, Stuart Richmond, Sarah Rish, Solanyi Robayo Solarte, Tara Robinson, Alison Rose, Beatrice Ross, Shannen Rowland-Clarke, Debapriya Roy, Monica Rudhar, Sophia Ruting, Christine Ryan, Tommy Ryan, Arshman Sonny Sahid, Amanda Saker, Joy Angelo Santos, Hiromi Sato, Isabella Satz, Valentina Schulte, Mara Schwerdtfeger, Kaitlyn Seeto, Manuela Serje, Raha Shahidi, Clive Sheridan, Joan Shim, Nanako Shimada, Meredith Shimmin, Joanna Shuen, Allen Shun, Madalena Silva, Jacinta Simmons, Marian Simpson, Plamena Slavcheva, Daniel Sleiman, Anne Smith, Bethany Smith, Hannah Smith, Josie Smith, Beth Sorensen, Nuno Rodrigues de Sousa, Rod Spark, Philippa Spencer-Carr, Lisa Stanizzo, Winston Stearn, Lina Stein, Leisa Stewart, Renae Swann, Melanie Sweetnam, Dena Taiebat, Misty lee Talbot, Jasmine Tan, Yiling Tan, Rosie Thomas, Janet Timberg, Lindsey Ting, Grace Toiava, Sze Tong, Laura Torrisi, Linh Tran, Roseanna Tran, Thi Cam Tu Tran, Navira Trimansyah, Bernadette Tsan, Natalie Tso, Nikki Van Der Horst, Elle Van Uden, Hope Vanny, Kainaaz Variava, Lauren Vasconcelos, Elena Velez, Nicola Vernot, Barac Veronica, Amy Vuong, Courtney Wagner, Ana Clara Waldburg, Jeremy Walker, Emily Walsh, Baily Wang, Jeffrey Wang, Joanna Wang, Linly Wang, Mia Wang, Ruifei Wang, Shelley Wang, Shuman Wang, Rebecca Weaver, Millicent Wheeler, Claudia Whitaker, Melissa Whitwell, Emma-Kate Wilson, Harrison Witsey, Lia Wittig, Catherine Wong, Clara Wong, Selly Wong, Carmel Woods, Frances Woods, Catherine Woolley, Regina Woonton, Isabella Wright, William Wu, Zhu Xinyu, Chen Xu, Katarina Yamasaki, Yu Yan, Ruyin Yang, Cecilie Yates, Wilson Yeung, Elaine Yip, Emily Yong, Christin Young, Mabel Yu, Tracy Yu, Vincent Yu, Pia Zeitzen, Gina Zhang, Hanli Zhang, Lindsay Zhang, Raylene Zhang, Ruby Zhang, Stephaine Zhang, Yang Zhang, Yu Zhang, Yuting Zhang, Annie Zhao, Yiwen Zhao, Zheng Zhao, Zhiheng Zhong, Yumeng Zhou, Carla Zimbler, Elly Zurowski.
The 20th Sydney Biennale … is packed with ideas, the most interesting one being the way the event is structured. Inspired by the political issue of people on the move, Rosenthal has designated the different venues “Embassies of Thought”. Traditional embassies look after their own, but in the art world there should be no borders, Rosenthal seems to be saying. Forget race, nationality and cultural background: these “safe spaces for thinking” are open to all.
Jane Ure-Smith
Financial Times, April 2016
Keg de Souza
16 Vine St Redfern
Daniel Boyd
Redfern Wall
Richard Bell
MCA Forecourt
Evan Roth
Online Project 20Bos.com
The joy of the Sydney Biennale is that, like its Venice counterpart, it takes us on a tour of discovery across the city, by boat and on foot, and showcases art in spectacular (if not quite so ancient) abandoned industrial spaces.
Jane Ure-Smith
Financial Times, April 2016
Image Captions

Intro Section

Lee Bul ‘Willing To Be Vulnerable’, 2015-16 heavy-duty fabric, metalised film, transparent film, polyurethane ink, fog machine, LED lighting, electronic wiring dimensions variable Installation view (2016) at Cockatoo Island for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist Created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney This project was made possible through the generous support of The Neilson Foundation and was assisted by Amorepacific Photograph: Ben Symons

Xu Zhen (Produced by MadeIn Company) ‘Eternity – Longxing Temple Buddha Statue Part Three; Tang Dynasty Buddha Statue; Longxing Temple Buddha Statue Part Five; Northern Qi Amitābha Statue; Vairochana; the Cosmic Buddha; Hebei Northern Qi Dynasty Standing Buddha Torso; Parthenon East Pediment’, 2013-14 glass-fibre reinforced concrete, artificial stone, steel, mineral pigments 502.5 x 1522 x 93 cm (with plinth) Installation view (2016) at Cockatoo Island for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist. Produced by MadeIn Company. Collection of White Rabbit Gallery, Sydney Photograph: Ben Symons

Justene Williams with Sydney Chamber Opera Reconceptualisation of the 1913 opera ‘Victory Over the Sun’, 2016 mixed-media installation with performances on Cockatoo Island, 18-20 March 2016 Performance documentation (2016) at Cockatoo Island for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery, Sydney Created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney This project was made possible through the generous support of Kate Mills and Sally Breen Photograph: Document Photography

Agatha Gothe-Snape ‘Physical Doorway (Three Ways)’, 2016 digital print on mesh PVC banner Installation view (2016) at Cockatoo Island for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist and The Commercial Gallery, Sydney Photograph: Ben Symons

Emma McNally ‘Choral Fields 1–12’, 2014­-16 graphite on paper 214 x 304 cm each Installation view (2016) at Cockatoo Island for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist Selected drawings created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney This project was made possible with generous assistance from The International Production Fund with support from Outset England Photograph: Ben Symons

Chiharu Shiota ‘Conscious Sleep’, 2016 beds, thread dimensions variable Installation view (2016) at Cockatoo Island for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist and Anna Schwartz Gallery, Melbourne This version was created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney This project was made possible with generous assistance from The Hansen Family and Blain|Southern Photograph: Ben Symons

Korakrit Arunanondchai ‘Painting with history in a room filled with people with funny names 3’, 2015-16 HD video, denim, foam, wood 24:55 mins Installation view (2016) at Cockatoo Island for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist; C L E A R I N G, New York and Brussels; and Carlos/Ishikawa, London This version was created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney This project was made possible with assistance from Dr Clinton Ng Photograph: Tai Spruyt


Exhibition Section

Kazimir Malevich Wallpaper design featuring images of set and costume designs for the opera ‘Victory Over the Sun’, 1913 Images courtesy the St Petersburg State Museum of Theatre and Music Installation view (2016) at the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia for the 20th Biennale of Sydney, also featuring excerpts from the score for ‘Victory Over the Sun’, 2015-16, by Huw Belling, created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney and performed on Cockatoo Island, 18-20 March, 2016 Photograph: Document Photography

Adam Linder ‘Some Proximity’, 2014 Choreographic service at the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia (16-21 March 2016) for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist and Silberkuppe, Berlin Photograph: Leila Joy

Céline Condorelli ‘Structure for Communicating with Wind’, from the series ‘Additionals’, 2012-13/2016 metallicised space blanket, curtain tape Installation view (2016) at the Museum for Contemporary Art Australia for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist This version was created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Photograph: Ben Symons

Noa Eshkol Installation view (2016) at the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia for the 20th Biennale of Sydney All works courtesy the Noa Eshkol Foundation for Movement Notation, Holon and Galerie neugerriemschneider, Berlin This project was made possible through generous assistance from the International Production Fund with support from Outset England and Outset Israel; Gene Sherman AM and Brian Sherman AM; and Galerie neugerriemschneider Photograph: Document Photography


Audience Section

Lee Bul ‘Willing To Be Vulnerable’, 2015-16 heavy-duty fabric, metalised film, transparent film, polyurethane ink, fog machine, LED lighting, electronic wiring dimensions variable Installation view (2016) at Cockatoo Island for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist Created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney This project was made possible through the generous support of The Neilson Foundation and was assisted by Amorepacific Photograph: Ben Symons

Artists Céline Condorelli, Nina Beier and Shahryar Nashat in conversation at the Embassy of Translation, moderator Attaché Anna Gritz, 17 March 2016. Pictured: Noa Eshkol’s wall carpets, installation view (2016) at the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia for the 20th Biennale of Sydney All works courtesy the Noa Eshkol Foundation for Movement Notation, Holon and Galerie neugerriemschneider, Berlin This project was made possible through generous assistance from the International Production Fund with support from Outset England and Outset Israel; Gene Sherman AM and Brian Sherman AM; and Galerie neugerriemschneider Photograph: Document Photography

Photographs of the 20th Biennale of Sydney design campaign Courtesy For The People

Mella Jaarsma ‘Dogwalk’, 2015-16 textile, leather, iron, stainless steel, stuffed animals dimensions variable, 12 costumes, approximately 200 x 100 x 100 cm each Installation view (2016) at the Art Gallery of New South Wales for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist and ARNDT Fine Art, Berlin Created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Photograph: Document Photography

Taro Shinoda ‘Abstraction of Confusion’, 2016 clay, pigment, ochre, tatami mats dimensions variable Installation view (2016) at the Art Gallery of New South Wales for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist Created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney This project was made possible through the generous support of the Andrew Cameron Family Foundation Photograph: Ben Symons

Nyapanyapa Yunupingu 23 larrakitj poles, created from 2010-2015 natural earth pigment on hollow log dimensions variable Installation view (2016) at the Art Gallery of New South Wales for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney The presentation of this project was made possible with generous assistance from Lucy, Tess and Tom Taylor Photograph: Document Photography


Media Section

Chiharu Shiota ‘Conscious Sleep’, 2016 beds, thread dimensions variable Installation view (2016) at Cockatoo Island for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist and Anna Schwartz Gallery, Melbourne This version was created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney This project was made possible with generous assistance from The Hansen Family and Blain|Southern Photograph: Ben Symons

Korakrit Arunanondchai ‘Painting with history in a room filled with people with funny names 3’, 2015-16 HD video, denim, foam, wood 24:55 mins Installation view (2016) at Cockatoo Island for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist; C L E A R I N G, New York and Brussels; and Carlos/Ishikawa, London This version was created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney This project was made possible with assistance from Dr Clinton Ng Photograph: Leila Joy

Archie Moore ‘A Home Away From Home (Bennelong/Vera’s Hut)’, 2016 mixed-media installation dimensions variable Installation view (2016) at Royal Botanic Garden Sydney for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist and The Commercial, Sydney Created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney This project was made possible with assistance from Neil Hobbs and Karina Harris, and Kevin O’Brien Photograph: Ben Symons

Charwei Tsai ‘Spiral Incense – Hundred Syllable Mantra’, 2016 spiral incense made of herbal materials dimensions variable Installation and detail views (2016) at Mortuary Station for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist Created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney This project was made possible with assistance from TKG+ Photograph: Ben Symons

Marco Chiandetti ‘The boundaries which divide Life from Death are at best shadowy and vague. Who shall say where the one ends, and where the other begins?’, 2016 (detail) mixed-media installation dimensions variable Installation view (2016) at Mortuary Station for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist Created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney This project was made possible through the generous support of Julian Knights AO and Lizanne Knights Photograph: Tai Spruyt


Development Section

Heman Chong ‘LEM2’, 2016 A functioning second-hand bookshop, dimensions variable Installation views (2016) at Carriageworks for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist; Wilkinson Gallery, London; Rossi & Rossi, London; and Vitamin Creative Space, Beijing Created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Photograph: Document Photography


Partners Section

Apichatpong Weerasethakul ‘Home Movie’, 2016 digital video 7 mins Installation view (2016) at Carriageworks for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist and Kick the Machine Films, Bangkok Created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Photograph: Apichatpong Weerasethakul

Gerald Machona ‘Uri Afronaut’, 2012 decommissioned Zimbabwean dollar, old South African rand, foam padding, fabric, wood, perspex, rubber, plastic tubing, nylon, gold leaf 181 x 53 x 38 cm Installation view (2016) at Carriageworks for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist Collection of Iziko South African National Gallery, Cape Town Photograph: Document Photography

Jamie North ‘Succession’, 2016 cement, steel, steel slag, coal ash, oyster shell, organic matter, various Australian native plants dimensions variable Installation view (2016) at Carriageworks for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery, Sydney Created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney This project was made possible with assistance from Georgie Taylor and John Phillips Photograph: Leila Joy

Boris Charmatz ‘manger’, 2014 Choreography: Boris Charmatz Performance, 60 mins (19 March 2016) presented at Carriageworks for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist Photograph: Zan Wimberley

Lee Mingwei ‘Guernica in Sand’, 2006/2016 mixed-media interactive installation; sand, wooden island, lighting 1300 x 643 cm Performance documentation and installation view (23 April 2016) at Carriageworks for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist. Collection of JUT Museum Pre-opening office, Taipei This version was created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney This project was made possible through the generous support of Penelope Seidler AM Photograph: Document Photography

Neha Choksi ‘In Memory of the Last Sunset’, 2016 Documentation of a dance performance by Alice Cummins at Carriageworks (19 March 2016) for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist and Project 88, Mumbai Created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Photograph: Document Photography

Mike Parr ‘BDH’, 2016 Performance documentation of an action (17 March 2016) at Carriageworks for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist and Anna Schwartz Gallery, Melbourne The presentation of this project was made possible with assistance from DETACHED, Hobart Created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Photograph: Tim da-Rin

Minouk Lim ‘Strange Fruit’, 2016 mixed-media installation dimensions variable Installation view (2016) at Carriageworks for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist Created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Photograph: Document Photography


Board and Staff Section

Karen Mirza and Brad Butler (left to right) ‘You are the Prime Minister’, 2015 neon, desks, chairs, Eton College King’s Scholarship Examination 2011 dimensions variable ‘ACT 02084’, 2016 digitally-printed wallpaper and framed screenprint 87 x 87 cm (screenprint) Created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney ‘The Ectoplasm of Neoliberalism’, 2015 (detail) digitally-printed silks 272 x 250 cm each, series of 8 (6 of 8 exhibited) Installation view (2016) at Artspace for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artists Photograph: Document Photography

Karen Mirza and Brad Butler (left to right) ‘Everything for Everyone and Nothing for Us’, 2014 HD video, 9 minutes Commissioned by Hayward Gallery, London ‘Hold Your Ground’, 2012 HD video, 7:57 mins Commissioned by Film and Video Umbrella, London Installation view (2016) at Artspace for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artists Photograph: Document Photography

Keg de Souza ‘We Built This City’, 2016 tents, tarps, hessian sacks, plaid laundry bags, dialogue, tour program dimensions variable Installation view at 16 Vine Street, Redfern, for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist Created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Photograph: Ben Symons

Daniel Boyd ‘What Remains’, 2016 (detail) site-specific installation, mirrored disks, synthetic polymer paint dimensions variable Installation view (2016) at Redfern Wall, Corner Vine Street and Eveleigh Street, Redfern for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist; Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney; and Station Gallery, Melbourne Created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Photograph: Ben Symons

Evan Roth Still from ‘Internet Landscapes: Sydney’, 2016 network located videos Courtesy the artist; Belenius, Stockholm; and Carroll Fletcher, London Created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney http://www.evan-roth.com/work/internet-landscapes-sydney/

Richard Bell ‘Embassy’, 2013-ongoing canvas tent with annex, aluminium frame, rope and screens; synthetic polymer paint on board Public programs (19 March 2016) on the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia forecourt for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Courtesy the artist and Milani Gallery, Brisbane This version was created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney Photograph: Document Photography

The depth of historical research in this biennale is impressive. Not only is the Futurist/Suprematist legacy played out to a formidable dead end, but the audience is conducted back to another important rupture in the evolution of contemporary art –that of the steady progress towards the dematerialisation of the art object (this could be considered the reductionism of the Black Square in another guise).
Anne Finegan
Artlink, April 2016